And behold…the funk was droppethed.

Of course, if you were having a massive three-person birthday dance party (complete with stage smoke and disco balls) you would shoot it on film, with a flash.

Mind you, focusing would be somewhat hard…and everyone would be relatively blind.

Will it Blend, Take 2 – 28mm

I don’t normally consider myself a “wide” guy…but I’ve long felt I’ve been missing out on 28mm.

Previous (brief) attempts at 21 and 25mm have yielded mixed results, and I just haven’t bonded with the lenses in question.

When the 7Artisans 28mm was announced, I tried long and hard to resist (😂) arguing that it really wasn’t that much different than 35mm; but you know me…I eventually gave in.

I have to say–so far I am certainly glad I did!  This lens (the now-discontinued “flare” version) was purchased from Hamish Gill over at 35mmc.com–I highly recommend him for his shipping and contact.

These were shot on Kodak BW400CN at ISO 400, and developed in C-41 chemistry.  They are all taken between f/1.4 and f/2.

Compendium 12 – Lost Relevance

 

This is Agfa Scala 160–but traditionally developed in D-76, instead of R100.  (Yes, it is somewhat a waste of the film, but I lost a roll’s worth of developer anyway…)

Granted, the negatives do not look as cool as the positives would have, but in this day and age, I can’t help but wonder if the relevance of transparency film has really passed.  Slide film is more difficult to expose properly, harder to scan, and certainly more difficult to develop. Given the ability to post-process (adjust blacks and contrast, mainly…) the resulting look is nearly identical.  Been there, done that…but otherwise hard to make the argument for reversal developing.

Sadness

Sometimes in photography, you have to document the sad with the happy…

And sometimes when you really want a snack (and can’t have one…) you get quite sad.

The Key on the Kite

…Otherwise known as “accidental scientific discovery”.

😂

Did you know that Eastman 5222 could be pushed to ISO 800?

Well I didn’t…at least not until I shot and developed this roll.  Which I assumed was either Ilford HP5+, or Ilford Pan F+.  (Yes, one was ISO 400, and the other ISO 50).  Anyway, I was pretty sure it was HP5+, so I shot and developed it at ISO 800.  Using the Neopan 400 times.  Because I also had a roll of that in there.

(Listen don’t ask—My system sucks…I know that).

Suffice it to say, this is Eastman 5222 pushed to, and developed at ISO 800.  These photos have zero artistic merit, but I thought I’d put them up here for the public record.  They are developed in D76 1:1–if you want to do so, use the Fuji Neopan 400 @ ISO 800 times.

I hope that even makes sense.